Sweet Moon, I thank thee for thy sunny beams. Shakespeare (Midsummer Night’s Dream)

Last night Moon’s dazzling light from my balcony made it seem almost as radiant as the sun, and turned our night into a never-ending twilight. Archaeological sites throughout Greece stayed open well after midnight, the  entrance was free, for visitors to enjoy the beauty. Lucky those who saw the brilliant white marble of the Acropolis, glowing in the moonlight, or the moon, hanging low over the sea and spent the night on the Aegean beaches. A recent article on Smithsonianmag refers to the Greek Philosopher Anaxagoras and useful info on the Moon.

”Close to the north pole of the moon lies the crater Anaxagoras, named for a Greek philosopher who lived in the fifth century B.C. The eponym is fitting, as Anaxagoras the man was one of the first people in history to suggest the moon was a rocky body, not all too dissimilar from Earth. Streaks of material thrown out during the impact that formed the crater extend 560 miles southward to the rim of another crater, this one named for Plato.” https://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-nature/ancient-greek-philosopher-was-exiled-claiming-moon-was-rock-not-god-180972447/

If you ever happen to visit Greece in August, do take part in the festivities, including singing, dancing, musical performances and poetry reading, food abundant and wine flowing, under the light of the moon. Down below find and buy for your little children one of the amazing books I suggest and enjoy the beautiful illustrations as well as text! Best summer wishes till my next Rock Post!



From writer Stacy McAnulty and illustrator Stevie Lewis, Moon! Earth’s Best Friend is a light-hearted nonfiction picture book about the formation and history of the moon―told from the perspective of the moon itself.

Meet Moon! She’s more than just a rock―she’s Earth’s rock, her best friend she can always count on. Moon never turns her back on her friend (literally: she’s always facing Earth with the same side!). These two will stick together forever. With characteristic humor and charm, Stacy McAnulty channels the voice of Moon in this next celestial “autobiography” in the Our Universe series. Rich with kid-friendly facts and beautifully brought to life by Stevie Lewis, this is an equally charming and irresistible companion to Earth! My First 4.54 Billion Years and Sun! One in a Billion.

A richly illustrated guide to the myths, histories, and science of the celestial bodies of our solar system, with stories and information about constellations, planets, comets, the northern lights, and more. 

Combining art, mythology, and science, What We See in the Stars gives readers a tour of the night sky through more than 100 magical pieces of original art, all accompanied by text that weaves related legends and lore with scientific facts. This beautifully packaged book covers the night sky’s most brilliant features–such as the constellations, the moon, the bright stars, and the visible planets–as well as less familiar celestial phenomena like the outer planets, nebulae, and deep space. Adults seeking to recapture the magic of youthful stargazing, younger readers interested in learning about natural history and outer space, and those who appreciate beautiful, hand-painted art will all delight in this charming book.

When the day has ended and everyone else has fallen asleep, a young boy embarks on a magical adventure with his friend the Moon. Their unusual journey is described in lyrical verse, creating a enchanting story that celebrates the serene beauty of the world at night. Jay’s trademark oil paintings with their crackled finish reveal charming details not mentioned in the verse: the moon loses one of its red slippers on the church steeple, for instance, and the boy recovers it in the next spread. The artist successfully marries the cool royal blue of the evening sky with the warm orange-reds of the buildings, many of which seem alive (two arched windows and a clock on the church tower form a face), alongside trees that appear to dance on curvy trunks. Boy and moon eventually link arms and accompany each other to their respective realms: the moon descends to skip across a bridge with the boy; boy and moon sail over a playground, and readers are treated to a bird’s-eye–view of a fanciful landscape. Endnotes for this soothing lunar lullaby contain facts about the moon’s phases and nocturnal animals.

nnie is preparing for Career Day at school, and is trying to follow her teacher’s directive to keep her career choice a secret. Every evening she works on her costume while her family asks for hints. Grandpop gives her a camera in hopes she will aspire to be a journalist like him. Grandma tells her about her days winning awards for her desserts and lets Annie borrow her mixing bowl and oven mitts. Dad is convinced that she’ll wants to be a mountain climber like him; and when Mom asks for a hint, she gives Annie some high-top sneakers hoping Annie will be a basketball player like she is. Annie does not commit to any of her family members’ career choices, but in the end shows that she can blend something from everyone and make it her own. Readers will have no doubt that Annie is well equipped to follow her dream to travel into space. The illustration of her room shows planets hanging from the ceiling, stars and moons on her bedspread and tissue box, space posters on the walls, and a telescope for stargazing. Tadgell’s watercolor illustrations are kid-friendly and complementary to Slade’s concise storytelling. Back matter gives a short biography of four female astronauts, information about the phases of the moon, and a list of sources to learn more. 

On time for the fiftieth anniversary of the moon landing, this father-daughter story celebrates a small community’s big contribution to one of America’s greatest accomplishments.

Marthanne and her father sit side by side, looking out over their mill village as the moon glows in the sky. Marthanne hopes that one day, man will walk on the moon, and she knows her father is helping America accomplish this mission: The fabric he weaves forms one layer in the astronauts’ spacesuits. Papa insists he’s only making a living, but Marthanne knows his work is part of history, and she’s proud. She tries to be patient, but she can’t stop imagining the moon mission: the astronauts tumbling through space, the fabric her papa made traveling all the way up into the sky. When the astronauts blast off and Neil Armstrong finally takes his first steps on the moon, Marthanne watches in wonder. She knows her papa put a man on the moon.

A stunning picture book that addresses the question: do any of us “own” nature?

 When a curious cat asks the question, “Whose moon is that?”, a panoply of animals try to stake their claim. The wolf, the owl, and the starry sky all have their reasons, but the moon ultimately answers for herself — her light is meant to be shared by everyone.  Many stake a claim on the orb, from a bird, a bear, and a wolf to a tree, a mountain, and the starry sky. In the end, the moon says it shines “for one and all, and none, throughout eternity.” Told in the “Alouette” verse form, this is an original tale. Full spreads bring the nocturnal world alive, with the night sky backgrounds in watercolor with a palette that incorporates the magical colors and movement of the aurora borealis. Each spread focuses on one particular subject and its connection with the moon. Krans’s signature intricate pen-and-ink illustrations are larger-than-life, such as an image of a bear looking straight at readers, the moon dropping behind her as she says she found the moon first and doesn’t “like to share.”

Kim Krans’s stunning ink-and-watercolor illustrations beautifully illuminate this simple exploration of our relationship to the world around us and our place in it.

“In this playful book, the anthropomorphized moon watches humans from afar and eagerly notes as they invent the first airplane, build rockets and prepare to take the first tentative steps on her surface. Through text and informative back matter, young readers learn fascinating facts about the moon, astronauts and the space program.

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