“Make a wish, look inside your dish Inside your dish, there’s candy fish Candy fish in chocolatey goo inside the goo are marshmallows too.” (One Fish, Two Fish, Red Fish, Blue Fish!)

July is here and heat goes up! Nothing better to do than read a book with icecream theme or play games online on making tonnes of icecreams!! https://www.agame.com/games/ice-cream-games

Ice cream’s origins are known to reach back as far as the second century B.C., although no specific date of origin nor inventor has been undisputably credited with its discovery. We know that Alexander the Great enjoyed snow and ice flavored with honey and nectar. Biblical references also show that King Solomon was fond of iced drinks during harvesting. During the Roman Empire, Nero Claudius Caesar (A.D. 54-86) frequently sent runners into the mountains for snow, which was then flavored with fruits and juices.

Over a thousand years later, Marco Polo returned to Italy from the Far East with a recipe that closely resembled what is now called sherbet. Historians estimate that this recipe evolved into ice cream sometime in the 16th century. England seems to have discovered ice cream at the same time, or perhaps even earlier than the Italians. “Cream Ice,” as it was called, appeared regularly at the table of Charles I during the 17th century. France was introduced to similar frozen desserts in 1553 by the Italian Catherine de Medici when she became the wife of Henry II of France. It wasn’t until 1660 that ice cream was made available to the general public. The Sicilian Procopio introduced a recipe blending milk, cream, butter and eggs at Café Procope, the first café in Paris. https://www.idfa.org/the-history-of-ice-cream

Suggested books for our little friends to spend their summer mornings or afternoons.

Isaac loves the sugar maple in his yard, and he can’t help but feel bad for it when its branches are winter-bare. He decides to give it a gift…and is surprised when the tree returns the favor in the new morning snow, presenting him with balls of…ice cream!

But how long can the magic last with spring on the horizon?

This magical exploration through the colors of the rainbow, the days of the week, and some of our favorite fruits is sure to delight readers of all ages!

What’s the Scoop?

Americans eat more ice cream than people in any other country (on average 48 pints per person a year). Where did this cool treat come from? And how did its popularity spread? If you’re curious about all things ice cream, this fun, visual 8 x 8 developed with the food curators at the Smithsonian is now on the menu!

It’s just another summer day until Teddy visits the new ice cream shop in town. Magically, he enters a kingdom of ice cream fountains, whipped cream lanes, and volcanoes that erupt with vanilla fudge! In this land of frosty treats, Teddy rules as the Ice Cream King. He can eat as much ice cream as he’d like, sail an ice cream sea, and even zoom to an ice cream moon. But something very important is missing. What could it be? Dig into this delicious adventure that serves up a gentle lesson in sharing!

Join Splat and his class on a field trip to an ice cream factory in this delectable I Can Read book from New York Times bestselling author-artist Rob Scotton.

Splat can barely sit still during the bus ride. He’s imagining the mountain of ice cream he thinks he’ll get to eat! But when Splat gets there, that mountain becomes more of an avalanche. It’s up to Splat and his classmates to save the day! Beginning readers will practice the –eam sound in this easy-to-read addition to the Splat series. Splat the Cat: I Scream for Ice Cream is a Level One I Can Read book, which means it’s perfect for children learning to sound out words and sentences.

Check the following site for more bedtime stories icecream for kids.

https://www.storyberries.com/bedtime-stories-the-worlds-best-ice-cream-stories-for-kids/

Try this incredible receipe https://www.anightowlblog.com/shark-frenzy-ice-cream/ and have as much icecream as possible.

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